• DC Crew

Cops Nationwide Make More Arrests for Cannabis Possession than for All Violent Crimes COMBINED

In 1971, President Richard Nixon formally declared the beginning of the ultimately doomed War on Drugs.


“America’s public enemy number one in the United States is drug abuse,” warned Tricky Dick, “In order to fight and defeat this enemy, it is necessary to wage a new, all-out offensive.”


Up until that time, the “all-out offensive” by law enforcement had been on real, hard crimes and as a result, 90% of homicides nationwide were being solved by authorities.


But the new War on Drugs forced law enforcement agencies to allocate sizable portions of their resources and manpower to satisfy the outgoing president’s demands.


As their budgets have been stretched more and more over the decades since, we have seen a drastic drop in the rate at which homicides are being solved so that today, only roughly 64% of them are ever brought to justice here in the U.S.


Instead, cops from coast to coast continue to crack down on cannabis while people are quite literally getting away with murder behind their backs.



The state of Ohio, and specifically the city of Columbus, are prime examples of the negative impact that the failed War on Drugs has had on entire communities.


The homicide clearance rate in Columbus is just 30%... less than half of the already pathetic national average.


In other words, 70% of murders in the city go unsolved.


In 2017 alone, Columbus recorded a city-record 143 homicide deaths. Consider how many families and friends are left without closure on those cases while the police pat each other on the back stackin’ dimesacks in the evidence room.


Authorities say that they simply do not have the resources to keep up with the killings, but the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) has done the math and has reported that the state of Ohio arrests an average of over 20,000 people every single year on cannabis possession and/or sales charges.


That has to cost something, right?


The thing is, it’s not just Columbus or Ohio, this is America and it’s nothing new.


A 2016 ACLU Human Rights Watch report revealed that 1 out of every 9 arrests in the U.S. is for drug possession. That equates to something like 1.25 million arrests each year.


Police in the United States make more arrests for cannabis possession each year than they do for ALL VIOLENT CRIMES COMBINED.


That is unacceptable.


But investigating, or ideally preventing, violent crimes usually involves violent criminals and that shit is way more difficult and dangerous than shaking down stoners and breaking up peaceful dab parties. So cops continue to settle for the low hanging fruit of non-violent cannabis-related arrests as long as the feds keep the victimless plant on the Schedule I shitlist as a part of Nixon’s zombified War on Drugs.


It is a perfect storm of our for-profit prison system being fed by nearly half a century of the federal government’s “war”.


It’s like the late, great Bill Hicks once said, “You know what that implies? There's a war being fought, and the people on drugs are winning it.”



© 2014 by Disorderly Conduction.

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